Mindfulness

Based on Buddhist philosophy, mindfulness is the practice of staying in the moment, being present to ourselves, and our environment. It is paying attention to the present moment on purpose, not trying to change things but accepting what is.

Many of us spend our time focused either on the past or the future, paying very little attention to what is happening NOW in the present, which means that for much of the time we may be unaware of our present experiences. Mindfulness is a way of being, of remaining in present awareness and practising the art of observation. It helps us to accept the way things are for better or for worse and without judgment.

Practising mindfulness can give people more insight into their emotions, boost their attention and concentration and improve relationships.

Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy has been scientifically proven to help people with a range of mental health problems such as:

  • Stress
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Depression
  • Bipolar Disorders
  • Addictive behaviours
  • Insomnia
  • Longer and better quality sleep, with fewer sleep disturbances
  • A reduction in negative feelings like anger, tension and depression
  • Improvements in physical conditions as varied as psoriasis, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, hypertension, heart disease

MBCT is also recommended by the National Institute for Clinical and Health Excellence (NICE) as an effective treatment for people who suffer from recurrent episodes of depression. In fact the evidence in support of Mindfulness Based Therapies is so strong that almost three-quarters of GPs think it would be beneficial for all patients to learn mindfulness meditation skills. http://www.bemindful.co.uk/mbct/about

I include mindfulness practice in the majority of my therapy sessions with clients. It is very easy to learn and a powerful tool of therapy.

If you are interested in learning to be mindful please contact me.